A Chromatic Installation by Felipe Pantone Turns a Public Walkway into an Architectural Kaleidoscope

A Chromatic Installation by Felipe Pantone Turns a Public Walkway into an Architectural Kaleidoscope

Monitoring Desk

Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone (previously) magnifies the prismatic principles that ground his Subtractive Variability series to a phenomenal scale in the newly installed “Quick Tide.” Whether working in kinetic sculpture or large-scale murals, Pantone investigates the vast realm of color theory and its bottomless potential, in this instance transforming the cyan, magenta, and yellow model into a dynamic display. “The idea of creating a system in which I can create endless color combinations within the visible color spectrum by simply rotating or displacing the same image over and over (in C, M, Y)… the results are always random, unexpected, yet always interesting for me,” Pantone tells Colossal.

The site-specific “Quick Tide” wraps the upper and lower levels of an elevated walkway in London’s Greenwich Peninsula with a vibrant collision of light and pigment—see Liz West’s transformation of the same outdoor space previously on Colossal. Angled blocks hold radial gradients to “make obvious where the different colors overlap and how different hues appear. These details are usually easy to find as chromatic aberrations in prints by looking under the magnifier,” the artist shares, noting that the combinations shift in appearance depending on the time of day and position of the viewer.

Pantone will soon open a solo show titled Manipulable at Tokyo’s Gallery COMMON that invites visitors to interact with the works, and you can follow updates on that exhibition and new works on Instagram.

Photo by Charles Emerson

Photo by Charles Emerson

Photo by Charles Emerson

Photo by Matt Alexander

Photo by Charles Emerson

Photo by Matt Alexander

Photo by Matt Alexander

Courtesy: colossal

The post A Chromatic Installation by Felipe Pantone Turns a Public Walkway into an Architectural Kaleidoscope appeared first on The Frontier Post.